ELBW Follow-up – Status

2016 Cohort – A cohort of ELBW infants born during 2016 are being tracked and evaluated between 18 and 24 months corrected age. The data collection for this cohort continues through May 2019.

2017 Cohort – A cohort of ELBW infants born during 2017 are being tracked and evaluated between 18 and 24 months corrected age. The data collection for this cohort continues through May 2020.

Most Recently Completed Cohort: 2015 Birth Year

Status: Completed

Results: Extremely low birth weight infants (401-1000g) or extremely low gestational age infants (between 22 weeks 0 days and 27 weeks 6 days), born during 2015 and who survived discharge were tracked and evaluated between 18 and 24 months corrected age at 42 participating Vermont Oxford Network centers. Overall, 1,484 infants survived and were eligible for follow-up. Of those infants, 978 received health and neurodevelopmental status evaluations. Twenty-three percent of these evaluated infants were severely growth retarded (< 3rd percentile body size) and 12% had microcephaly (< 3rd percentile head size). Thirty-seven percent of the infants were re-hospitalized. Overall, 22% had severe disability defined as having one of the following: bilateral blindness (3%), hearing impairment requiring amplification (4%), inability to walk with support (23%), cerebral palsy (36%) or cognitive deficit (any BSID < 70) (81%).

Previous Three Years: 2013-2015 Birth Year Cohort

Results: Extremely low birth weight infants (401-1000 g) or extremely low gestational age infants (between 22 weeks 0 days and 27 weeks 6 days) born between 2012-2014 who survived discharge home were tracked and evaluated between 18 and 24 months corrected age at 44 participating Vermont Oxford Network Centers. Data completed for the 2015 Cohort year was combined with data for the completed 2013and 2014 cohorts and analyzed as a three year cohort. Overall, 4,238 survived and were eligible for follow-up. Of those infants, 1,560 received health and neurodevelopmental status evaluations. Twenty-four percent of these evaluated infants were severely growth retarded (< 3rd percentile body size) and 12% had microcephaly (< 3rd percentile head size). Thirty-seven percent of the infants were re-hospitalized. Overall, 21% had severe disability defined as having one of the following: bilateral blindness (2%), hearing impairment requiring amplification (5%), inability to walk with support (21%), cerebral palsy (36%), or cognitive deficit (any BSID < 70) (80%).